Constitution Day, September 17th

Guest essay by James and Barbara Rose

We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

It appears to me … little short of a miracle that the delegates from so many different states (which states … are also different from each other in their manners, circumstances, and prejudices) should unite in forming a system of national government so little liable to well-founded objections.”  [“The adoption of the Constitution] will demonstrate as visibly the finger of Providence as any possible event in the course of human affairs can ever designate it.—George Washington (Signer of the Constitution, First President)

God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever—Thomas Jefferson (Signer of the Declaration)

The only foundation of a free constitution is pure virtue; and if this cannot be inspired into our people in a greater measure than they have it now, they may change their rulers and the forms of government, but they will not obtain a lasting liberty. They will only exchange tyrants and tyrannies.—John Adams (Signer of the Declaration of Independence)

I have so much faith in the general government of the world by Providence that I can hardly conceive a transaction of such momentous importance [as the framing of the Constitution] … should be suffered to pass without being in some degree influenced, guided, and governed by that omnipotent, omnipresent, and beneficent Ruler in whom all inferior spirits live and move and have their being.—Benjamin Franklin (Signer of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution)

Our safety, our liberty, depends upon preserving the Constitution of the United States as our fathers made it inviolate. The people of the United States are the rightful masters of both Congress and the courts, not to overthrow the Constitution, but to overthrow the men who pervert the Constitution.—Abraham Lincoln

A Republic If You Can Keep It!—Benjamin Franklin

Scripture:

Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD, the people He has chosen as His own inheritance.—Psalm 33:12

Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people.—Proverbs 14:34

For the nation and kingdom which will not serve you shall perish, and those nations shall be utterly ruined.—Isaiah 60:12

If My people who are called by My name will humble themselves, and pray and seek My face, and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin and heal their land.—2 Chronicles 7:14

More from the Founding Fathers:

Can it be, that Providence has not connected the permanent felicity of a Nation with its virtue?  The experiment, at least, is recommended by every sentiment which ennobles human Nature.—George Washington

A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue then will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.—Samuel Adams (Letter to James Warren, 12 February 1779)

The only foundation of a free constitution is pure virtue; and if this cannot be inspired into our people in a greater measure than they have it now, they may change their rulers and the forms of government, but they will not obtain a lasting liberty. They will only exchange tyrants and tyrannies.—John Adams

The first and almost the only Book deserving of universal attention is the Bible. Our Constitution was made for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate for the government of any other.—John Quincy Adams

God who gave us life gave us liberty. And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with His wrath? Indeed, I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that His justice cannot sleep forever.—Thomas Jefferson

It is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favors.—George Washington, Thanksgiving Proclamation, October 3, 1789.

The power under the Constitution will always be in the people.  It is entrusted for certain defined purposes, and for a certain limited period, to representatives of their own choosing; and whenever it is executed contrary to their interest, or not agreeable to their wishes, their servants can , and undoubtedly will be, recalled.—George Washington

2015 is the 60th Anniversary of Constitution Week.

Note: Miss Gertrude S. Carraway, while President General of NSDAR, was responsible for the annual designation of September 17-23 as Constitution Week. The DAR made its own resolution for Constitution Week, which was adopted April 21, 1955.   Members of the United States Congress received the DAR resolution and on June 7, 1955, the resolution was discussed in the Senate. The first resolution to observe Constitution Week was made June 14, 1955, by Senator William F. Knowland of California. Following the passage of the resolution by both Houses of Congress, President Eisenhower issued his proclamation on August 19, 1955.


This presentation first appeared as a circular email newsletter, The Eagle’s Aerie, September 2014. This version received minor editing to update date references and for formatting.

James and Barbara Rose are the founders and executives of the American Christian History Institute. The Roses have had far-reaching influence toward the restoration of America’s Christian foundation through their lifetime of work in education—in schools, their home school organization, and public speaking in small and large venues.

© 2015 Used by Permission

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